Category Archives: IJHS 7 (1)

IJHS volume 7, issue 1

Reducing interprofessional conflicts in order to facilitate better rural care: A report from a 2016 Rural Surgical Network Invitational Meeting

Author: Hayley Pelletier

Abstract

An invitational meeting organized by the Centre for Rural Health Research convened to facilitate respectful dialogue with general surgeons in British Columbia to clearly understand concerns and address questions around rural family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (FPESS). In particular, the meeting focused on interprofessional challenges that hinder the adoption of a network model between general surgeons and FPESS. This report summarizes the findings (n=5) and recommendations (n=8) from the meeting. The meeting underscored the need for more thoughtful discussions to develop interprofessional trust and support between general surgeons and FPESS through an integrated health care system and proper networks.

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An Interdisciplinary Population Health Approach to the Radon Health Risk Management in Canada

Authors: Selim M. Khan, James Gomes

Abstract

Radon is a known carcinogen found in indoor air that exists at higher than the federal reference level (200 Bq/m3) in about 10% of Canadian homes. Every year, over 3,000 people die from radon-induced lung cancer, which accounts for 16% of annual lung cancer deaths in Canada. Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer deaths among non-smokers and is second among smokers. Children, women, and smokers from lower income groups are disproportionately affected. Although the Federal Government has reset the guideline (from the previous 600 Bq/m3 down to 200 Bq/m3) and provincial governments revised the building codes to limit exposure, there remain controversies with the latest scientific development in adopting strategies of radon management in Canada.

This review applies an Integrated Population Health Framework to look at the relationships and interactions between population health determinants such as biology and genetics, environment and occupation, and social and economic factors, that influence the health risk of radon. The evidence gathered supports policy analysis with the application of ethical and risk management principles that lead to the identification of efficient and affordable broad-based and population-level preventive strategies. The final inferences enhance the framework by adding critical intervention modalities to Health Canada’s National Radon Program.

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Conflict and disease: A complex relationship

Author: Robert A. Frank 

Societies will always be subjected to situations that test their tolerance thresholds. When a stressor exceeds a society’s capacity to cope, “failure” of the system is often manifested as social unrest, falling along a spectrum of intensity ranging from civil wars and revolutions to riots, strikes, and protests (Braha, 2012). The conflict leading to social unrest is most often initiated by groups on the disadvantaged end of systemic inequalities, as a desperate effort at effecting change (Haas, 1986). Although social unrest is sometimes a necessary vehicle for cultural revolution, the resultant disruption of society invariably creates a volatile environment that is vulnerable to adverse health outcomes (Jovanović, Renn, & Schröter, 2012).

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