Category Archives: Blog (EN)

Mortality prediction with a single question

“On a scale from 1 to 5, how would you rate your own health?”

Self-reported or self-rated health status (SRH) is a commonly used indicator in both clinical epidemiology and population health. It is a subjective measure of health that is thought to reflect an individual’s integrated perception of the domains of health, including biological, psychological, and social dimensions. The World Health Organization considers SRH to be a reflection of population health and healthy life expectancy within countries1. It is assessed either by a questionnaire or by a single question which asks subjects to rate their own health, usually on a four or five-point scale from poor to excellent. SRH has been used as a health indicator in epidemiological studies since the 1950s, and has been found to predict future health outcomes independent of physical, socio-demographic, and psychosocial indicators2-5. It is widely considered to be a valid indicator of health status.

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Sexual Health Education Programs in Ontario and Quebec: A Passing Grade or Flunking Out?

In 2015, Ontario and Quebec introduced new sexual health education programs in elementary and secondary schools. Formal evaluations on the effectiveness of these education programs have yet to be conducted. For now, however, we can pose some preliminary questions: What are their similarities and differences between the two curricula? How comprehensive are they? What do they bring that is novel? Could we give each of them a passing grade?

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Digital Health Platforms to Improve Health of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

Authors: Sara Hanafy, Ayah Nayfeh

Increasing conflict and political fragility in Syria has forced the large-scale displacement of millions of Syrians into neighbouring countries like Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey. Nearly one in every four people in Lebanon is a refugee, many of whom are women and children whose medical needs are not being met [1]. The influx of refugees from Syria over the past five years has moved Lebanon from the 69th largest refugee-hosting country to the third largest.

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2017 CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

2017 Call for Submissions

The Determinants of Health

We invite you to submit an abstract for consideration for our upcoming issue. Submission criteria are based on the twelve determinants of health as outlined by Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada. Upon submission, it should be clear which determinant of health is associated with your paper – how is the subject related to human health through the chosen determinant of health?

Abstract Guidelines

To ensure a high-quality publication, all abstract submissions will be subject to preliminary assessments by the Editorial Board for suitability of content. Abstracts must be sent electronically to
riss.ijhs.peerreview@gmail.com by August 15, 2017. The contact author will receive notification of abstract acceptance by August 18, 2017. 

• Title: 25 word limit
• Length: 250 word limit
• Authors: Name every contributing author, using their full names.
• References: No references are to be included in the abstract.

Authors whose abstracts have been accepted will be asked to submit their completed manuscript by September 15, 2017.

Submission Timeline

  • Abstract Submission Opens: August 1st 2017
  • Abstract Submission Closes: August 15th 2017
  • Accept/Reject Notification: August 18th 2017
  • Manuscript Deadline: September 15th 2017

Types of submissions

Completed manuscripts may include an original research article, an essay, or a review paper, in English or French. The word limit does not include the references.

  • Original articles: 4000 word limit
    • Either quantitative or qualitative
    • Includes review articles, case reports, literature reviews and clinical experiments.
  • Article, Book or Media reviews: 1000 word limit
  • Essay: 1250 word limit

How to submit

To submit a completed manuscript, please do so by using the Open Journal System (OJS). In order to make a submission, you must register as a user and create an author account. You will be asked to provide the necessary information about the authors and the submission itself, to attach the file you are submitting, and to agree with our terms and conditions of use. We do not accept any submission by email or by mail.

Manuscripts will be peer-reviewed and selected articles will be published in the upcoming issue of the IJHS. As the IJHS is a bilingual and an open-access endeavour, every abstract will be translated and all articles will be freely accessible to the public.

Troubleshooting

If you experience any trouble submitting your manuscript, please contact editor@riss-ijhs.ca to report the issue and seek assistance.

Healthcare and Climate Change

The healthcare sector has come to represent an environmental concern, due to its facilities’ massive consumption of energy and production of biomedical waste. As such, we observe a troubling paradox: while the healthcare sector seeks to ensure population health and prevent illnesses, it contributes directly to greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn greatly hinders population health and well-being.

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Saturated Fat: Friend or Foe?

Saturated fat has long been demonized by public health experts due to its established effect on raising cholesterol and, by proxy, association with increased cardiovascular disease. However, a recent editorial by Malhotra et al. (2016) [1], claiming that reduced saturated fat has no effect on coronary heart disease, has caught the attention of the media and the public, many of whom are now wondering if they can consume all of the butter and bacon they want without worrying about the health of their hearts.

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Sexual and Reproductive Heath and Rights: A Global Obligation

Authors: Kassandra Messier, Ayah Nayfeh

Universal access to sexual and reproductive health care is at the forefront of human rights issues of the 21st century. Every year in developing countries, there are 74 million unintended pregnancies leading to approximately 36 million abortions. Of these abortions, 21 million are unsafe which makes up nearly 13% of all maternal deaths globally [1]. The global advancement of sexual and reproductive health and rights are susceptible to change in 2017, as new international aid agendas are set.

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Addressing the Social Determinants of Health: Actions from the City

Social determinants of health are the social, economic, and environmental factors that influence health and well-being. Social determinants influence health as they define the extent of resources and opportunities that can be made available to individuals, given their social location (Marmot & Wilkinson, 2005; Raphael, 2009). They explain the health disparities observed among individuals and represent an important and continuing public health concern within the health promotion and health services spheres of research.

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Healthcare in Cuba: Defining Features and Future Trends

In 2016, Cuba made headlines for the status of its economic embargo with the US, its increasing foreign investments through tourism, and the death of Fidel Castro. Besides these recent events, in a sense foreshadowing Cuba’s future political and economic paths, throughout the 20th century, Cuba’s healthcare system has been acclaimed as one of the best healthcare systems in the world with very good health outcomes for the Cuban people. For example, infant mortality is lower than in the US and the life expectancy is 77.5 years of age (WHO, 2016). What are the Cuban healthcare system’s defining features? Will recent events alter some of its key aspects?

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Finding Potential in Another Mother’s Breastmilk

In Canada, the primary cause of mortality in infancy and long-term disability in children is being born at very low birth weight (<1500g or <3.3lbs; Saigal & Doyle, 2008). If these infants are fed their mother’s milk in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) they experience fewer severe infections (Hylander, Strobino, & Dhanireddy, 1998; Patel et al., 2013), improved feeding tolerance (Schanler, Shulman, & Lau, 1999; Sisk, Lovelady, Gruber, Dillard, & O’Shea, 2008), lower colonization of pathogenic bacteria (Yoshioka, Iseki, & Fujita, 1983), and increased neurocognitive development (Anderson, Johnstone, & Remley, 1999). However, due to many reasons related to preterm birth, as many as 70% of mothers cannot provide a sufficient amount of breastmilk to meet the demands of these infants, therefore, a supplement is necessary (Callen & Pinelli, 2005). Currently in Canada, either pasteurized donor breastmilk (donor milk) or preterm formula is used as a supplement to mother’s milk.

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