Ontario Election 2018 — What About Health?

June 6, 2018 – In our long awaited second episode, Stephen Kutcher and Raywat Deonandan discuss the upcoming Ontario provincial election.

A couple of documents were cited in this episode:

The election happens on June 7, 2018.


Dans notre deuxième épisode tant attendu, Stephen Kutcher et Raywat Deonandan discutent des prochaines élections provinciales en Ontario. Quelques documents ont été cités dans cet épisode:

L’élection a lieu le 7 juin 2018.

The Global Burden of Surgical Disease: An Analysis of Inaccessible Surgical Care in Low and Middle Income Countries

Authors: Chau Huynh, Minh NQ Huynh

Abstract

Worldwide, 4.8 billion people do not have access to safe, adequate surgical care and anaesthetic management. Surgical care has been deemed “the neglected child of global health,” a startling reminder of the disparities in health services. The provision of surgical interventions can avert 11% of the global burden of disease and 1.5 million deaths each year. Many obstacles exist for low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to progress towards accessible surgical care. The first challenge is delivering cost-effective surgical care despite financial constraints and political turmoil. Foreign aid was established to alleviate the financial burden and its contributions have been pivotal. However, based on the political climate in certain countries, funds are siphoned to government sectors other than health care. Moreover, the lack of infrastructure, equipment, and personnel in LMIC compound the issue. The other challenge is determining if surgery is as feasible and effective as non-surgical health interventions. Surgical care is crucial and this paper aims to assess the challenges that limit its stature in global health discussions. The paper will address the influence of financing, infrastructure, workforce, service delivery, and information management on surgical care, and the current resolutions, such as humanitarian aid missions.

Continue reading The Global Burden of Surgical Disease: An Analysis of Inaccessible Surgical Care in Low and Middle Income Countries

Mortality prediction with a single question

“On a scale from 1 to 5, how would you rate your own health?”

Self-reported or self-rated health status (SRH) is a commonly used indicator in both clinical epidemiology and population health. It is a subjective measure of health that is thought to reflect an individual’s integrated perception of the domains of health, including biological, psychological, and social dimensions. The World Health Organization considers SRH to be a reflection of population health and healthy life expectancy within countries1. It is assessed either by a questionnaire or by a single question which asks subjects to rate their own health, usually on a four or five-point scale from poor to excellent. SRH has been used as a health indicator in epidemiological studies since the 1950s, and has been found to predict future health outcomes independent of physical, socio-demographic, and psychosocial indicators2-5. It is widely considered to be a valid indicator of health status.

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An overview of scientific-based knowledge on sedentary behaviour among the pediatric population – A conceptual model development

Author: Salomé Aubert

Abstract

Sedentary behaviour has been identified as a specifically deleterious personal practice on multiple levels of health of individuals at all ages, including the pediatric population (i.e., 0 to 18 years of age). The aims of this paper are to (I) summarize the literature concerning the definition, the characteristics, the context, the determinants and the consequences of sedentary behaviour among children and youth; (II) propose a conceptual model that summarizes these findings; and finally (III) highlight research gaps in the literature. Sedentary behaviours are common and complex behaviours that can potentially affect the health of children and youth on the physiological and psychological levels. Those deleterious effects on health can vary depending on how they are accumulated throughout the day, for example with or without interruption, or in which context. While childhood engagement in sedentary behaviours is too high in the majority of countries where it has been assessed, developing research and policies that target the reduction of sedentary behaviours among children and youth must be ranked as a top priority for all public health organizations worldwide. Although further research is needed concerning the identification of the specific determinants and consequences of different types and patterns of sedentary behaviours in various contexts, the Conceptual Model for the Study and Understanding of Children and Youth’s Sedentary Behaviour, which I have proposed in this paper, gives an overview of the topic and supports the development of policy and further research.

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2017 CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

2017 Call for Submissions

The Determinants of Health

We invite you to submit an abstract for consideration for our upcoming issue. Submission criteria are based on the twelve determinants of health as outlined by Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada. Upon submission, it should be clear which determinant of health is associated with your paper – how is the subject related to human health through the chosen determinant of health?

Abstract Guidelines

To ensure a high-quality publication, all abstract submissions will be subject to preliminary assessments by the Editorial Board for suitability of content. Abstracts must be sent electronically to
riss.ijhs.peerreview@gmail.com by August 15, 2017. The contact author will receive notification of abstract acceptance by August 18, 2017. 

• Title: 25 word limit
• Length: 250 word limit
• Authors: Name every contributing author, using their full names.
• References: No references are to be included in the abstract.

Authors whose abstracts have been accepted will be asked to submit their completed manuscript by September 15, 2017.

Submission Timeline

  • Abstract Submission Opens: August 1st 2017
  • Abstract Submission Closes: August 15th 2017
  • Accept/Reject Notification: August 18th 2017
  • Manuscript Deadline: September 15th 2017

Types of submissions

Completed manuscripts may include an original research article, an essay, or a review paper, in English or French. The word limit does not include the references.

  • Original articles: 4000 word limit
    • Either quantitative or qualitative
    • Includes review articles, case reports, literature reviews and clinical experiments.
  • Article, Book or Media reviews: 1000 word limit
  • Essay: 1250 word limit

How to submit

To submit a completed manuscript, please do so by using the Open Journal System (OJS). In order to make a submission, you must register as a user and create an author account. You will be asked to provide the necessary information about the authors and the submission itself, to attach the file you are submitting, and to agree with our terms and conditions of use. We do not accept any submission by email or by mail.

Manuscripts will be peer-reviewed and selected articles will be published in the upcoming issue of the IJHS. As the IJHS is a bilingual and an open-access endeavour, every abstract will be translated and all articles will be freely accessible to the public.

Troubleshooting

If you experience any trouble submitting your manuscript, please contact editor@riss-ijhs.ca to report the issue and seek assistance.

Reducing interprofessional conflicts in order to facilitate better rural care: A report from a 2016 Rural Surgical Network Invitational Meeting

Author: Hayley Pelletier

Abstract

An invitational meeting organized by the Centre for Rural Health Research convened to facilitate respectful dialogue with general surgeons in British Columbia to clearly understand concerns and address questions around rural family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (FPESS). In particular, the meeting focused on interprofessional challenges that hinder the adoption of a network model between general surgeons and FPESS. This report summarizes the findings (n=5) and recommendations (n=8) from the meeting. The meeting underscored the need for more thoughtful discussions to develop interprofessional trust and support between general surgeons and FPESS through an integrated health care system and proper networks.

Continue reading Reducing interprofessional conflicts in order to facilitate better rural care: A report from a 2016 Rural Surgical Network Invitational Meeting

An Interdisciplinary Population Health Approach to the Radon Health Risk Management in Canada

Authors: Selim M. Khan, James Gomes

Abstract

Radon is a known carcinogen found in indoor air that exists at higher than the federal reference level (200 Bq/m3) in about 10% of Canadian homes. Every year, over 3,000 people die from radon-induced lung cancer, which accounts for 16% of annual lung cancer deaths in Canada. Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer deaths among non-smokers and is second among smokers. Children, women, and smokers from lower income groups are disproportionately affected. Although the Federal Government has reset the guideline (from the previous 600 Bq/m3 down to 200 Bq/m3) and provincial governments revised the building codes to limit exposure, there remain controversies with the latest scientific development in adopting strategies of radon management in Canada.

This review applies an Integrated Population Health Framework to look at the relationships and interactions between population health determinants such as biology and genetics, environment and occupation, and social and economic factors, that influence the health risk of radon. The evidence gathered supports policy analysis with the application of ethical and risk management principles that lead to the identification of efficient and affordable broad-based and population-level preventive strategies. The final inferences enhance the framework by adding critical intervention modalities to Health Canada’s National Radon Program.

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Sexual and Reproductive Heath and Rights: A Global Obligation

Authors: Kassandra Messier, Ayah Nayfeh

Universal access to sexual and reproductive health care is at the forefront of human rights issues of the 21st century. Every year in developing countries, there are 74 million unintended pregnancies leading to approximately 36 million abortions. Of these abortions, 21 million are unsafe which makes up nearly 13% of all maternal deaths globally [1]. The global advancement of sexual and reproductive health and rights are susceptible to change in 2017, as new international aid agendas are set.

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Addressing the Social Determinants of Health: Actions from the City

Social determinants of health are the social, economic, and environmental factors that influence health and well-being. Social determinants influence health as they define the extent of resources and opportunities that can be made available to individuals, given their social location (Marmot & Wilkinson, 2005; Raphael, 2009). They explain the health disparities observed among individuals and represent an important and continuing public health concern within the health promotion and health services spheres of research.

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Healthcare in Cuba: Defining Features and Future Trends

In 2016, Cuba made headlines for the status of its economic embargo with the US, its increasing foreign investments through tourism, and the death of Fidel Castro. Besides these recent events, in a sense foreshadowing Cuba’s future political and economic paths, throughout the 20th century, Cuba’s healthcare system has been acclaimed as one of the best healthcare systems in the world with very good health outcomes for the Cuban people. For example, infant mortality is lower than in the US and the life expectancy is 77.5 years of age (WHO, 2016). What are the Cuban healthcare system’s defining features? Will recent events alter some of its key aspects?

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